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Living With Epilepsy

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I was diagnosed with Epilepsy right before my 37th birthday this past year. I don’t look at this health issue as a handicap. I look at this as an opportunity for progression. Millions are being treated for Epilepsy in the United States. African Americans are more likely to develop Epilepsy during their life than Caucasians. Let’s bring awareness and silence the fear associated with this medical condition. Here’s my journey so far Living with Epilepsy.

Imagine taking your regular mental break from work (even doing a two-step to the fantastic music you are listening to) to wake up to EMTs asking you what your first name is. You fade out again. The next time you wake up, you are in a hospital bed where your family looks worried, and a physician tells you that your life will never be the same again after having multiple seizures.

Tonic-Clonic Seizures are the type of seizures I had. These types of seizures consist of two stages: tonic and clonic. I lost consciousness during the tonic and clonic stages and did not wake up for minutes. According to my son (who was attending remotely for school at the time), said I let out a thunderous cry, passed out, and my body began to jerk for what felt like to him for five minutes. When he tried to wake me, I was baffled, sad, and lost control of my bladder. I always taught my son in the event anything happens while we are learning or working remotely to call 911. He did just that (even though he was terrified). I’m very grateful that I was not alone at home that day, my son called 911, and I was not driving when this occurred.

Subsequently, the physician explained that since I have Epilepsy, I will need to take meds twice a day to prevent them from occurring and ultimately live a healthy life. Still, compliance and living a stress-free lifestyle are essential. Since receiving my diagnosis early this year, I’ve been compliant with my meds, stress-free (as much as possible), spreading awareness about Epilepsy with family, friends, etc., and seizure-free for eight months now. So, there is hope. I hope that maybe there will be a cure for this medical condition. I truly believe that awareness plays a huge part in all of this.

In reality, not sure what I would have done without the awareness foundations such as the Epilepsy Foundation. Its mission is to bring awareness to all communities to find therapies cures and save lives for those living with Epilepsy. My journey has just begun. As an ambassador and seizure certified (to help others just in case this happens to someone around me), I will do my part in the African American community to bring awareness. I know Epilepsy will be defeated one day.

 

 

 

 

 

References:

https://www.epilepsy.com/

https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org  

 

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